AMND_graph

This diagram displays which characters speak to each other in A Midsummer Night's Dream.


Several interesting patterns emerge:
  • The characters group cleanly into the mechanicals, the fairies and the court.
  • The three groups have little direct contact:
    • Bottom is the only character who talks with people in each group.
    • The mechanicals (other than Bottom) never encounter the fairies.
    • The court people don't encounter the mechanicals  in the woods.
    • The court people generally don't even know the fairies exist.
  • The three groups have different conversations patterns:
    • The mechanicals rarely talk directly to each other individually; they
      • talk to Bottom,
      • talk to Quince,
      • talk to the whole group as a whole, or
      • speak their lines in the play.
    • The fairies favor linear connections: 
      • Titania speaks with Oberon
        • who speaks with Puck;
          • who speaks with a Fairy in Act 2.
      • Even when Titania and Bottom's talk to the little fairies, the little fairies never speak to each other.
      • Due to this linear structure,
        • Oberon is the only main character who speaks to Puck;
        • Puck and Titania never speak to each other.
    •  The court contains two conversation subgroups: younger and older.
      • The younger subgroup (Hermia, Lysander, Demetrius, Helena) talk directly at each other, but rarely address themselves as a group.
      • The older subgroup funnels its conversations through Theseus:
        • Egeus, Hippolyta and Philostrate speak only to Theseus, never to each other.
        • In fact, Hippolyta only ever speaks to Theseus!
      • Conversations between the older and younger subgroups are limited:
        • Theseus speaks to Hermia and Demetrius;
        • Egeus speaks to Demetrius and Lysander;
      • Notably missing links in the court conversations:
        • Egeus never speaks to Hermia;
        • Theseus never speaks to Lysander;
        • No one from the older court speaks to Helena!
ą
Harry Robinson,
Jul 26, 2016, 7:56 AM
Comments